Wednesday, August 7, 2013

Death by Living: Life is mean to be spent.

This book had my attention, well up until the point I to sick to do anything except lay in bed, but I couldn't keep my mind off the subject. Death by Living by N. D. Wilson is a wonderful book about stories, adventures, time, family, life! Wilson says that stories are the closest our own words can ever come to being made flesh. I know your thinking what does that mean? Read the book!  He reminisces through memories of this grandfather as well as his own life. He examines the similarities and expresses the gratitude of the little things in life.  





One thing learned from this book is gratitude. Never take things for granite, whether the good or bad things happen for a reason.  If you are one who wonders about life and living, or even if you are one who is holding onto everything this world has to offer, stop and slow down enjoy the life you have because you only have one.  I would highly recommend this book to anyone. Side note. If you have read his previous book Notes From the Tilt-A-Whirl and didn't like it, don't judge a man by his first book. Give this one a shot and read it.

I will leave you with one last quote from the book: "Drink your wine. Laugh from your gut. Burden your moments with thankfulness. Be as empty as you can be when that clock winds down. Spend your life. And if time is a river, may you leave a wake."

*I received this book as a complimentary review copy from Thomas Nelson Publishers through their BookSneeze.com book review program. All opinions expressed are my own and are in no other way influenced or compensated by anyone.

Wednesday, July 3, 2013

“Who Do You Think You Are?"



Who do you think you are? Why are you here on this earth, at this time? What is your purpose?  These
are real life questions that everyone regardless of where they are at in life have to wrestle with. The
conclusion of these questions determines how we respond to circumstances in life.  Many theologians
have struggle to answer these basic questions of life, such as Ravi Zacharias asks it in three ways; what
is Meaning, Morality, and Destiny?  Francis Shaffer gets to the practical outcome of the questions in his
book “How then Shall we live?” In, “Who Do You Think You Are: Finding Your True Identity in Christ”,
Mark Driscoll takes on the task of examine the book of Ephesians to answer these basic fundamental
questions of origin, meaning of life, morality and destiny. The book of Ephesians is a glorious book
divided into 6 chapters, which can be divided into 2 basic categories: identity and ethics, orthodoxy and
orthopraxy, or purpose and duty. Driscoll does an excellent job explaining how knowing your identity
can set you free from bondage of sin.  He explains in the open chapter of how we run to different
“identity idols” instead of turning to Christ.  My favorite part in the book was his distinction in chapter
2 of explaining who we are in Christ. In the opening verses of Ephesians, Paul, under the inspiration of
the Holy Spirit, articulates what we have as a result of being “in Christ.”  Driscoll gave some interesting
insight about how we should label ourselves as being “in Christ,” instead of referring to ourselves as
Christians.  He doesn’t elaborate on this point much, but the implications are enormous!  Think about
it by telling someone or reminding yourself that you are, “in Christ” you are reminding yourself of
your identity, which will help you overcome doubt and apathy.  I would highly recommend this book,
especially if you are studying the book of Ephesians.


*I received this book as a complimentary review copy from Thomas Nelson Publishers through their BookSneeze.com book review program. All opinions expressed are my own and are in no other way influenced or compensated by anyone.